Art Reproductions - Canvas Prints - Oil Painting Reproductions by TOPofART

Basket of Fruit, c.1596/97 by Caravaggio

Oil Painting Reproduction
Oil Painting Reproduction
Actual Painted Size:
$426.00 ...:

We can make your art reproduction to look aged and cracked as the museum original.

You can select the aged look effect from the menu under the image of the painting.

×
Information Box for Aged Look Effect
Aged Look: ......
$$426
Creation time: 4-5 weeks
Free WorldWide ShippingShips Free!

Free WorldWide Standard Shipping (10-14 business days) $0.00 USD

EMS (4-5 business days)

FedEx (2 business days)

The cost of priority and express delivery depends on weight and destination. You can check the estimate shipping cost of your order in the shopping cart screen.

×
Select Your Size
Select Aged Look Effect
Videos from Process of Reproducing of TOPofART Oil Painting
Basket of Fruit (c.1597) is a painting by the Italian Baroque master Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610), which hangs in the Biblioteca Ambrosiana (Ambrosian Library), Milan.

It shows a wicker basket perched on the edge of a ledge. The basket contains a selection of summer fruit:

... a good-sized, light-red peach attached to a stem with wormholes in the leaf resembling damage by oriental fruit moth (Orthosia hibisci). Beneath it is a single bicolored apple, shown from a stem perspective with two insect entry holes, probably codling moth, one of which shows secondary rot at the edge; one blushed yellow pear with insect predations resembling damage by leaf roller (Archips argyospita); four figs, two white and two purple the purple ones dead ripe and splitting along the sides, plus a large fig leaf with a prominent fungal scorch lesion resembling anthracnose (Glomerella cingulata); and a single unblemished quince with a leafy spur showing fungal spots. There are four clusters of grapes, black, red, golden, and white; the red cluster on the right shows several mummied fruit, while the two clusters on the left each show an overripe berry. There are two grape leaves, one severely desiccated and shriveled while the other contains spots and evidence of an egg mass. In the right part of the basket are two green figs and a ripe black one is nestled in the rear on the left. On the sides of the basket are two disembodied shoots: to the right is a grape shoot with two leaves, both showing severe insect predations resembling grasshopper feeding; to the left is a floating spur of quince or pear.

Much has been made of the worm-eaten, insect-predated, and generally less than perfect condition of the fruit. Possibly Caravaggio simply painted what was available; or possibly it has some meaning along the general lines of 'all things decay'; more specifically, there may be a reference to the Book of Amos 8:1-2: "This is what the Lord God showed me - a basket of summer fruit. He said, "Amos, what do you see?" And I said, "A basket of summer fruit." Then the Lord God said to me, "The end has come upon my people Israel; I will never again pass them by." (God is angry with Israel for neglecting the poor, and there may be a pun in Hebrew between 'basket of fruit' and 'the end').

A recent X-ray study revealed that it was painted on an already used canvas painted with grotesques in the style of Caravaggio’s friend Prospero Orsi, who helped the artist in his first breakthrough into the circles of collectors such as his first patron, Cardinal Francesco Maria Del Monte, around 1594/1595, and who remained close to him for many years thereafter.

Scholars have had more than their usual level of disagreement in assigning a date to the painting: John T. Spike places it in 1596; Catherine Puglisi believes that 1601 is more probable; and practically every year in between has been advanced. Puglisi's reasoning seem solid, (the basket in this painting seems identical with the one in the first of Caravaggio's two versions of Supper at Emmaus - even the quince seems to be the same piece of fruit), but no consensus has emerged.

In 1607 it was part of Cardinal Federico Borromeo’s collection, a provenance which raises the plausibility of a conscious reference to the Book of Amos. Borromeo, who was archbishop of Milan, was in Rome approximately 1597-1602 and a house guest of Del Monte in 1599. He had a special interest in the Northern European painters such as Paul Brill and Jan Brueghel the Elder, who were also in Rome at the time, (indeed, he took Breughel into his own household), and in the way they did landscapes and flowers in paintings as subjects in their own right, something not known at the time in Italian art. He would have seen the way Caravaggio did still life as incidental accessories in paintings such as Boy Bitten by a Lizard, Bacchus, in Del Monte's collection, and The Lute Player in the collection of Del Monte's friend Vincenzo Giustiniani. The scholarly Giustiniani wrote a treatise on painting years later, wherein, reflecting the hierarchical conventions of his day, he placed flowers "and other tiny things" only fifth on a twelve-scale register, but he said also that Caravaggio once said to him "that it used to take as much workmanship for him to do a good picture of flowers as it did to do one of human figures."

Like its doppelganger in Supper at Emmaus, the basket seems to teeter on the edge of the picture-space, in danger of falling out of the painting and into the viewer's space instead. In the Supper this is a dramatic device, part of the way in which Caravaggio creates the tension of the scene; here, trompe l'oeil seems to be almost the whole purpose of the painting, if we subtract the possible didactic element. But the single element that no doubt attracted it's original owner, and still catches attention today, is the extraordinary quasi-photographic realism of the observation which underlies the illusionism. Basket of Fruit can be compared with the same artist's Still Life with Fruit (c. 1603), a painting which John Spike identifies as "the source of all subsequent Roman still-life paintings."
Basket of Fruit, c.1596/97 | Caravaggio| Painting Reproduction

Painting Title:

Basket of Fruit, c.1596/97

Artist:

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio (1571-1610)

Location:

Pinacoteca Ambrosiana Milan Italy


Original Size:

31 x 47 cm

Medium:

Painting Reproduction completely hand-painted with oil on blank linen canvas.


Creation Time:

Your Caravaggio Hand-Painted Art Reproduction must not be rushed as it need time for reaching the high quality and precision and also for getting dry. Depending of the complexity and the details of the painting, we need of several weeks for creation of the painting.

Shipping:

We not frame oil painting reproductions. The Hand-Painted Art Reproduction is expensive product and the risk of damages during transport of stretched on a frame painting is too high. "Basket of Fruit" by Caravaggio is unframed and will be shipped rolled up in postal tube.
You can check the estimate shipping cost of your order in the shopping cart screen.
Painting Reproduction with Oil on Canvas - Step by Step Making in Images
We create our paintings only with museum quality. Our academy educated European painters never allow compromise with the quality and the details. TOPofART not work with Far East wholesalers with poor quality.

Reviews

Be the first to write a review.

Add Review